Ir al contenido

Guidebook for Ancient English City of Winchester

Bali

Guidebook for Ancient English City of Winchester

Food Scene
Built by a wealthy merchant in the Middle Ages, The Chesil Rectory dates back to between 1425-1450, and is one of Winchester's best preserved Medieval buildings. The building is charmingly wonky, with an original black beam frontage and tiny entrance door that livestock once trampled through. It used to belong to Mary Tudor, who was bequeathed it by King Henry VIII – a present she later gave to the City of Winchester as part payment for her lavish wedding at Winchester Cathedral to King Philip of Spain (it nearly bankrupted the city). History aside, The Chesil Rectory is our favourite place for dinner in Winchester because of the romantic, candle-lit atmosphere (see how many vintage chandeliers you can count) and the delicate style of cooking.
22
personas locales recomiendan
The Chesil Rectory
1 Chesil Street
22
personas locales recomiendan
Built by a wealthy merchant in the Middle Ages, The Chesil Rectory dates back to between 1425-1450, and is one of Winchester's best preserved Medieval buildings. The building is charmingly wonky, with an original black beam frontage and tiny entrance door that livestock once trampled through. It used to belong to Mary Tudor, who was bequeathed it by King Henry VIII – a present she later gave to the City of Winchester as part payment for her lavish wedding at Winchester Cathedral to King Philip of Spain (it nearly bankrupted the city). History aside, The Chesil Rectory is our favourite place for dinner in Winchester because of the romantic, candle-lit atmosphere (see how many vintage chandeliers you can count) and the delicate style of cooking.
The Old Vine offers food and drinks 150 metres from Winchester Cathedral.
13
personas locales recomiendan
The Old Vine
8 Great Minster Street
13
personas locales recomiendan
The Old Vine offers food and drinks 150 metres from Winchester Cathedral.
History of The Wykeham Arms. At 250-odd years old, since 1755, the Wykeham was a coaching inn and has been a pub on this site, quenching the thirst of travellers moving to and from the coast. It used to be a brothel and also put Lord Nelson up for a night (some say the events coincided) on his way to Portsmouth. In the eccentric bar tankards and school canes hang from the ceiling and worn school desks lend pint-supping an illicit air. The menu (served noon to 2.30pm and 6pm to 9pm) covers the bar food standards, from well-executed burgers and fish and chips, to 24oz rib-eye steaks on the bone.
24
personas locales recomiendan
The Wykeham Arms
75 Kingsgate St
24
personas locales recomiendan
History of The Wykeham Arms. At 250-odd years old, since 1755, the Wykeham was a coaching inn and has been a pub on this site, quenching the thirst of travellers moving to and from the coast. It used to be a brothel and also put Lord Nelson up for a night (some say the events coincided) on his way to Portsmouth. In the eccentric bar tankards and school canes hang from the ceiling and worn school desks lend pint-supping an illicit air. The menu (served noon to 2.30pm and 6pm to 9pm) covers the bar food standards, from well-executed burgers and fish and chips, to 24oz rib-eye steaks on the bone.
William Walker MVO (1869–1918) was a famous English diver. Between 1906 and 1911, Walker worked in water up to a depth of six metres (20 feet), to shore up Winchester Cathedral, using more than 25,800 bags of concrete, 114,900 concrete blocks, and 900,000 bricks. The work cost around £113,000 in Edwardian times – the equivalent of well over one million pounds today. When it was finished, both King George V and the Archbishop of Canterbury congratulated Bill at a special thanksgiving service on 15 July 1912. Jackson and Fox were knighted, while Bill was made a member of the Victorian Order.
The William Walker
34 The Square
William Walker MVO (1869–1918) was a famous English diver. Between 1906 and 1911, Walker worked in water up to a depth of six metres (20 feet), to shore up Winchester Cathedral, using more than 25,800 bags of concrete, 114,900 concrete blocks, and 900,000 bricks. The work cost around £113,000 in Edwardian times – the equivalent of well over one million pounds today. When it was finished, both King George V and the Archbishop of Canterbury congratulated Bill at a special thanksgiving service on 15 July 1912. Jackson and Fox were knighted, while Bill was made a member of the Victorian Order.
Upscale chain brasserie serving a classically French menu devised by celebrity chef Raymond Blanc.
6
personas locales recomiendan
Brasserie Blanc - Winchester
19/20 Jewry St
6
personas locales recomiendan
Upscale chain brasserie serving a classically French menu devised by celebrity chef Raymond Blanc.
12
personas locales recomiendan
The Ivy Winchester Brasserie
12
personas locales recomiendan
Michelin guided restaurant.
16
personas locales recomiendan
The Black Rat Restaurant
88 Chesil St
16
personas locales recomiendan
Michelin guided restaurant.
Casual dining on seasonal British menus in a former mill with exposed beams and painted brick walls.
14
personas locales recomiendan
River Cottage Kitchen
14
personas locales recomiendan
Casual dining on seasonal British menus in a former mill with exposed beams and painted brick walls.
Drinks & Nightlife
Pub with quirky, 'antique emporium' decor, a string of local real ales and a covered outside area.
15
personas locales recomiendan
The Black Boy
1 Wharf Hill
15
personas locales recomiendan
Pub with quirky, 'antique emporium' decor, a string of local real ales and a covered outside area.
History of The Wykeham Arms. Since 1755, when it was a coaching inn, there has been a pub on this site, quenching the thirst of travellers moving to and from the coast. Lord Nelson himself was said to have stayed here in his way to Portsmouth!
24
personas locales recomiendan
The Wykeham Arms
75 Kingsgate St
24
personas locales recomiendan
History of The Wykeham Arms. Since 1755, when it was a coaching inn, there has been a pub on this site, quenching the thirst of travellers moving to and from the coast. Lord Nelson himself was said to have stayed here in his way to Portsmouth!
Traditional red-brick pub/restaurant with a riverside terrace and classy pub-style British food.
Bishop on the Bridge
Traditional red-brick pub/restaurant with a riverside terrace and classy pub-style British food.
The Eclipse has an important connection to the 1680’s. Dame Alice Lisle, the grand lady of Hampshire was held here for her execution after being sentenced to death for harbouring rebels by the notorious “hanging” Judge Jeffries. The jury prevaricated, believing her story that she gave food water and shelter to those who arrived at her door in need. Judge Jeffreys was beside himself with rage and as the jury made their deliberations he sought to bully a guilty verdict out of them and reluctantly they gave it. It was a decision that sat ill with the county and the country. Glance up at the upper storey window, from here she stepped out onto a scaffold structure specially erected for the occasion and was beheaded on 5th September 1685. Thought to now be haunted, there have been acclaimed repeated sightings down the years of a (friendly) ghost of the “Lady in Grey” in the passage outside the room where Lady Alicia was held."
The Eclipse Inn
25 The Square
The Eclipse has an important connection to the 1680’s. Dame Alice Lisle, the grand lady of Hampshire was held here for her execution after being sentenced to death for harbouring rebels by the notorious “hanging” Judge Jeffries. The jury prevaricated, believing her story that she gave food water and shelter to those who arrived at her door in need. Judge Jeffreys was beside himself with rage and as the jury made their deliberations he sought to bully a guilty verdict out of them and reluctantly they gave it. It was a decision that sat ill with the county and the country. Glance up at the upper storey window, from here she stepped out onto a scaffold structure specially erected for the occasion and was beheaded on 5th September 1685. Thought to now be haunted, there have been acclaimed repeated sightings down the years of a (friendly) ghost of the “Lady in Grey” in the passage outside the room where Lady Alicia was held."
The use of this site as a prison is thought to date from 1228. In 1805, accommodation at the gaol was improved by the building of a new prison for debtors. The very centre of this new building was the Governor’s House – now this pub is run by Weatherspoon. After a new prison opened in Romsey Road, in 1849, the old gaol closed and was sold.
The Old Gaolhouse
The use of this site as a prison is thought to date from 1228. In 1805, accommodation at the gaol was improved by the building of a new prison for debtors. The very centre of this new building was the Governor’s House – now this pub is run by Weatherspoon. After a new prison opened in Romsey Road, in 1849, the old gaol closed and was sold.
Drinks at Incognito in Winchester are served with a theatrical flourish that guarantees the wow factor. It is on the ground floor of St John’s House, a Grade I-listed building dating back to the 10th century, when it was a hospital. It is believed Florence Nightingale, known as the heroine of the Crimean War worked at St John's House. Aside from bar snacks, food is available at weekends from midday to 4pm at the popular Bottomless Brunch where, for £29.99 per person, guests can enjoy cheeses, pates, breads and other dishes alongside prosecco. Incognito is also a destination for live jazz at weekends and some week nights.
7
personas locales recomiendan
Incognito Winchester
7
personas locales recomiendan
Drinks at Incognito in Winchester are served with a theatrical flourish that guarantees the wow factor. It is on the ground floor of St John’s House, a Grade I-listed building dating back to the 10th century, when it was a hospital. It is believed Florence Nightingale, known as the heroine of the Crimean War worked at St John's House. Aside from bar snacks, food is available at weekends from midday to 4pm at the popular Bottomless Brunch where, for £29.99 per person, guests can enjoy cheeses, pates, breads and other dishes alongside prosecco. Incognito is also a destination for live jazz at weekends and some week nights.
Sightseeing
Explore more than 1000 years of history in Europe’s longest (556ft) medieval Cathedral. Discover the beautiful illuminated Winchester Bible, 12th-century wall paintings, medieval carvings, contemporary art and the awe and wonder of this magnificent building. This superb low-vaulted stone crypt, which floods in rainy months, dates from the 11th century, the earliest phase of building the Cathedral. Here you’ll find Antony Gormley’s mysterious life-size sculpture of a solitary man, Sound II, sometimes standing up to its knees in water. You can see the crypt and sculpture by taking our Crypt Tour. Mary Tudor chose Winchester Cathedral for her wedding to Prince Philip of Spain. Daughter of King Henry VIII and his first wife, Catherine of Aragon, she and Philip exchanged vows on 25 July, 1554. Winchester Cathedral was chosen for various reasons. By far the most important was the security risk, thanks to England’s fragile relationship with Spain. Geography was also a key consideration as Philip travelled by sea and docked at Southampton, so the city was conveniently nearby. Cathedral Guides offer tours of the Cathedral each hour from 10am – 3pm and tours of the crypt at 10.30am, 12.30pm and 2.30pm from Monday to Saturday. Adult – £9.50 Concession – £7.50 Student – £6 Children under 16 visiting with family – Free Tower tour – £7.50
68
personas locales recomiendan
Catedral de Winchester
9 The Close
68
personas locales recomiendan
Explore more than 1000 years of history in Europe’s longest (556ft) medieval Cathedral. Discover the beautiful illuminated Winchester Bible, 12th-century wall paintings, medieval carvings, contemporary art and the awe and wonder of this magnificent building. This superb low-vaulted stone crypt, which floods in rainy months, dates from the 11th century, the earliest phase of building the Cathedral. Here you’ll find Antony Gormley’s mysterious life-size sculpture of a solitary man, Sound II, sometimes standing up to its knees in water. You can see the crypt and sculpture by taking our Crypt Tour. Mary Tudor chose Winchester Cathedral for her wedding to Prince Philip of Spain. Daughter of King Henry VIII and his first wife, Catherine of Aragon, she and Philip exchanged vows on 25 July, 1554. Winchester Cathedral was chosen for various reasons. By far the most important was the security risk, thanks to England’s fragile relationship with Spain. Geography was also a key consideration as Philip travelled by sea and docked at Southampton, so the city was conveniently nearby. Cathedral Guides offer tours of the Cathedral each hour from 10am – 3pm and tours of the crypt at 10.30am, 12.30pm and 2.30pm from Monday to Saturday. Adult – £9.50 Concession – £7.50 Student – £6 Children under 16 visiting with family – Free Tower tour – £7.50
Founded in 1382 by William of Wykeham, Bishop of Winchester 1366-1404, Winchester College is believed to be the oldest continuously running school in the country. Guided tours concentrate on the medieval heart of the College and include Chamber Court, which takes its name from the Scholars’ and Fellows’ chambers enclosing it; the 14th century Gothic Chapel with one of the earliest examples of a wooden vaulted roof; College Hall, the original Scholars’ dining room; School, the 17th century redbrick schoolroom and the original medieval cloister. Today the College educates around 700 boys aged 13 to 18, with the 70 scholars still housed in these medieval buildings. Adult ticket – £8 Student and Senior Citizen ticket – £7 Monday – Saturday: 10.15am, 11.30am, 2.15pm, (3.30pm April – August only) Sunday: 2.15pm & 3.30pm (2:15pm tour only December – January)
13
personas locales recomiendan
Winchester College
13
personas locales recomiendan
Founded in 1382 by William of Wykeham, Bishop of Winchester 1366-1404, Winchester College is believed to be the oldest continuously running school in the country. Guided tours concentrate on the medieval heart of the College and include Chamber Court, which takes its name from the Scholars’ and Fellows’ chambers enclosing it; the 14th century Gothic Chapel with one of the earliest examples of a wooden vaulted roof; College Hall, the original Scholars’ dining room; School, the 17th century redbrick schoolroom and the original medieval cloister. Today the College educates around 700 boys aged 13 to 18, with the 70 scholars still housed in these medieval buildings. Adult ticket – £8 Student and Senior Citizen ticket – £7 Monday – Saturday: 10.15am, 11.30am, 2.15pm, (3.30pm April – August only) Sunday: 2.15pm & 3.30pm (2:15pm tour only December – January)
At the bottom of Northbrook Avenue, a few minutes walk from your accommodation, you will see panoramic views from St. Giles Hill, the summit of a Chalk Spur, which fails steeply to east bank of River Itchen. Formerly, in the late 11th Century, the St. Giles Fair, the largest fair in Europe was held at this park every September. For the sixteen days of the fair, all other trading in Winchester ceased, and the Bishop received the revenues normally due to the King. Encroached upon by villa building at the end of the 19th Century, when the trees to be seen today were planted. Public outcry stopped the building and saved the summit and south west slopes of hill as open space, which affords magnificent views over the City and St. Catherine’s Hill. I often go down with my tea and cake, or highly recommend for a picnic spot. Free of charge.
St. Giles Hill - View Point
At the bottom of Northbrook Avenue, a few minutes walk from your accommodation, you will see panoramic views from St. Giles Hill, the summit of a Chalk Spur, which fails steeply to east bank of River Itchen. Formerly, in the late 11th Century, the St. Giles Fair, the largest fair in Europe was held at this park every September. For the sixteen days of the fair, all other trading in Winchester ceased, and the Bishop received the revenues normally due to the King. Encroached upon by villa building at the end of the 19th Century, when the trees to be seen today were planted. Public outcry stopped the building and saved the summit and south west slopes of hill as open space, which affords magnificent views over the City and St. Catherine’s Hill. I often go down with my tea and cake, or highly recommend for a picnic spot. Free of charge.
The Great Hall, “one of the finest surviving aisled halls of the 13th century”, contains the greatest symbol of medieval mythology, King Arthur’s Round Table, and is all that now remains of Winchester Castle. The iconic Round Table of Arthurian legend that has dominated Winchester’s ancient Great Hall for centuries. This is one of the finest surviving examples of a 13th century aisled hall and is an enhancement of the original Winchester Castle built by William the Conqueror. It has been carefully examined in recent times, and the conclusion has been that it was made at the end of the 13th century as a symbolic ornament for a feast held after a great tournament celebrating King Edward I’s vision for the future of the English crown. The legs were cut off, the surface covered with painted leather and the table hung in Winchester castle hall by King Edward III. Discover the history and uncover the battles, secrets and trials for terrorism and treason held here. Adult £3. Children under 5 FREE, Students, Seniors, Disabled £2.50. The Great Hall offers guided tours at 11.00 and 15.00 everyday.
28
personas locales recomiendan
The Great Hall
28
personas locales recomiendan
The Great Hall, “one of the finest surviving aisled halls of the 13th century”, contains the greatest symbol of medieval mythology, King Arthur’s Round Table, and is all that now remains of Winchester Castle. The iconic Round Table of Arthurian legend that has dominated Winchester’s ancient Great Hall for centuries. This is one of the finest surviving examples of a 13th century aisled hall and is an enhancement of the original Winchester Castle built by William the Conqueror. It has been carefully examined in recent times, and the conclusion has been that it was made at the end of the 13th century as a symbolic ornament for a feast held after a great tournament celebrating King Edward I’s vision for the future of the English crown. The legs were cut off, the surface covered with painted leather and the table hung in Winchester castle hall by King Edward III. Discover the history and uncover the battles, secrets and trials for terrorism and treason held here. Adult £3. Children under 5 FREE, Students, Seniors, Disabled £2.50. The Great Hall offers guided tours at 11.00 and 15.00 everyday.
The Butter Cross of Winchester is a Holy Cross, dating back to the mid C14th, it is thought it may have been a gift of Cardinal Beaufort who was Bishop of Winchester from 1404 – 1447. It may well have replaced a much earlier cross associated with the monastic buildings and the Old Minster. The earlier crosses were often carved with quite complex iconography and richly painted. Certainly the C15th Butter Cross is replete with figures. There are twelve of them, the Blessed Virgin and a plethora of saints, Bartholemew,Peter, Swithun, John, Lawrence, Maurice and Thomas. Later figures added are those of William of Wykeham, Lawrence de Anne, King Alfred and the oldest either representing St John the Evangelist or St Amphibalus. Free of charge.
Winchester Buttercross
The Butter Cross of Winchester is a Holy Cross, dating back to the mid C14th, it is thought it may have been a gift of Cardinal Beaufort who was Bishop of Winchester from 1404 – 1447. It may well have replaced a much earlier cross associated with the monastic buildings and the Old Minster. The earlier crosses were often carved with quite complex iconography and richly painted. Certainly the C15th Butter Cross is replete with figures. There are twelve of them, the Blessed Virgin and a plethora of saints, Bartholemew,Peter, Swithun, John, Lawrence, Maurice and Thomas. Later figures added are those of William of Wykeham, Lawrence de Anne, King Alfred and the oldest either representing St John the Evangelist or St Amphibalus. Free of charge.
Tucked beside the Headmaster's House of Winchester College at 8 College Street is an unobtrusive mustard-coloured building. If not for the blue plaque above the door it would be easy to pass by this ordinary dwelling. It was here that the celebrated Regency novelist, Jane Austen, spent the last two months of her life in Winchester, most of her time in a “neat little drawing room with a bow window”. Austen lived at nearby Chawton for several years, but in 1817 her health began to fail from Addisons disease and she came to Winchester with her sister Cassandra to receive better medical care for . It was a forlorn hope, and on July 18, 1817, Jane Austen died aged just 41, and was buried at nearby Winchester Cathedral. Jane Austen's house is now let as a private home, and there is no visitor access. Free of charge.
8 College St
8 College St
Tucked beside the Headmaster's House of Winchester College at 8 College Street is an unobtrusive mustard-coloured building. If not for the blue plaque above the door it would be easy to pass by this ordinary dwelling. It was here that the celebrated Regency novelist, Jane Austen, spent the last two months of her life in Winchester, most of her time in a “neat little drawing room with a bow window”. Austen lived at nearby Chawton for several years, but in 1817 her health began to fail from Addisons disease and she came to Winchester with her sister Cassandra to receive better medical care for . It was a forlorn hope, and on July 18, 1817, Jane Austen died aged just 41, and was buried at nearby Winchester Cathedral. Jane Austen's house is now let as a private home, and there is no visitor access. Free of charge.
Alfred’s settlement with the Vikings was the first step to creating England as we know it. When the Normans invaded in 1066, the Anglo-Saxons had one king and Winchester was the national capital. Free of charge.
King Alfred the Great - Statue
65 The Broadway
Alfred’s settlement with the Vikings was the first step to creating England as we know it. When the Normans invaded in 1066, the Anglo-Saxons had one king and Winchester was the national capital. Free of charge.
Winchester City Mill is probably the oldest working watermill in the country, its history dating back over a thousand years. The building has a remarkable past with historic connections ranging from King Alfred the Great and JMW Turner, through to its preservation from demolition in 1928 and rebirth as a working mill by the National Trust and is a Grade II* listed building. The mill was recorded, milling corn, in the Domesday Book of 1086. However there are earlier references going back to 932 in the cathedral records. The mill was used as a laundry during World War I.
Winchester City Mill
174 High Street
Winchester City Mill is probably the oldest working watermill in the country, its history dating back over a thousand years. The building has a remarkable past with historic connections ranging from King Alfred the Great and JMW Turner, through to its preservation from demolition in 1928 and rebirth as a working mill by the National Trust and is a Grade II* listed building. The mill was recorded, milling corn, in the Domesday Book of 1086. However there are earlier references going back to 932 in the cathedral records. The mill was used as a laundry during World War I.
Situated alongside the existing Winchester Cathedral, in the mid 7th century a Minster church called the Old Minister was built inside the Roman walls of Winchester. (A Minster church is one with a monastery attached). It was later known as the Old Minster. In 676 the Bishop of Wessex moved his seat to Winchester and the Old Minster became a cathedral. Christianity hauled Winchester from the obscurity of the Dark Ages. In 635AD Cynegils, King of Wessex, was baptised. His son and heir Cenwalh then founded a church - later known as Old Minster – in Wintanceastre (Winchester). It soon became the city’s first cathedral, built to the north of the present building. Many of the Kings of Wessex – and England – were buried there. Their bones still lie in the cathedral. Under King Egbert, Wessex became the centre of a united England, with Winchester as its capital. However in the 9th century it was subjected to Viking raids. Its saviour was King Alfred the Great, who defeated the Danes, revived the Church and recreated a community based on law and order. Alfred reorganised Winchester’s defences, had its walls rebuilt and its present street pattern laid out. He also founded a mint, and is thought to have been the inventor of the halfpenny coin. Alfred died in 899AD and was buried in Old Minster. His remains were then transferred to New Minster, founded in 903AD by his son, Edward the Elder. Edward the Confessor was the last Anglo-Saxon king to be crowned in Winchester, on 3 April 1043.
Little Minster Street
Situated alongside the existing Winchester Cathedral, in the mid 7th century a Minster church called the Old Minister was built inside the Roman walls of Winchester. (A Minster church is one with a monastery attached). It was later known as the Old Minster. In 676 the Bishop of Wessex moved his seat to Winchester and the Old Minster became a cathedral. Christianity hauled Winchester from the obscurity of the Dark Ages. In 635AD Cynegils, King of Wessex, was baptised. His son and heir Cenwalh then founded a church - later known as Old Minster – in Wintanceastre (Winchester). It soon became the city’s first cathedral, built to the north of the present building. Many of the Kings of Wessex – and England – were buried there. Their bones still lie in the cathedral. Under King Egbert, Wessex became the centre of a united England, with Winchester as its capital. However in the 9th century it was subjected to Viking raids. Its saviour was King Alfred the Great, who defeated the Danes, revived the Church and recreated a community based on law and order. Alfred reorganised Winchester’s defences, had its walls rebuilt and its present street pattern laid out. He also founded a mint, and is thought to have been the inventor of the halfpenny coin. Alfred died in 899AD and was buried in Old Minster. His remains were then transferred to New Minster, founded in 903AD by his son, Edward the Elder. Edward the Confessor was the last Anglo-Saxon king to be crowned in Winchester, on 3 April 1043.
At the top of High Street, Westgate is one of only 2 surviving city gates, the other being Kingsgate. The upper floor contains a small museum with displays on Tudor and Stuart Winchester. You can dress up in Tudor clothes, try your hand at brass rubbing, and climb the narrow stairs to the roof for a look over the rooftops of Winchester.
Westgate Place
80-82 Sussex St
At the top of High Street, Westgate is one of only 2 surviving city gates, the other being Kingsgate. The upper floor contains a small museum with displays on Tudor and Stuart Winchester. You can dress up in Tudor clothes, try your hand at brass rubbing, and climb the narrow stairs to the roof for a look over the rooftops of Winchester.
This picturesque Elizabethan timber-framed building next to the Close Gate, with its towering gables and leaded windows, once served as the Bishop of Winchester’s courthouse. The long timber-framed building next to it dates from 1479 and was once the priory’s stable block.
Cheyney Court
3 The Cl
This picturesque Elizabethan timber-framed building next to the Close Gate, with its towering gables and leaded windows, once served as the Bishop of Winchester’s courthouse. The long timber-framed building next to it dates from 1479 and was once the priory’s stable block.
This fine late 15th-century gate is one of the two gates into the city with its two massive iron-studded oak gates once gave access to the ‘working’ courtyard of the medieval priory, including a guest-house and stabling for visitors. It’s still closed up every evening. The gate is topped by a tiny room, originally part of the organist’s house. Free of charge.
College Street
This fine late 15th-century gate is one of the two gates into the city with its two massive iron-studded oak gates once gave access to the ‘working’ courtyard of the medieval priory, including a guest-house and stabling for visitors. It’s still closed up every evening. The gate is topped by a tiny room, originally part of the organist’s house. Free of charge.
Located in the heart of the historic city of Winchester, City Museum tells the story of England’s ancient capital, the seat of Alfred the Great. From its origins as an Iron Age trading centre to Anglo‑Saxon glory, the last journey of Jane Austen to the hunt for King Alfred’s remains, explore the sights and sounds of Winchester past and present in the museum’s three galleries.
10
personas locales recomiendan
Winchester City Museum
10
personas locales recomiendan
Located in the heart of the historic city of Winchester, City Museum tells the story of England’s ancient capital, the seat of Alfred the Great. From its origins as an Iron Age trading centre to Anglo‑Saxon glory, the last journey of Jane Austen to the hunt for King Alfred’s remains, explore the sights and sounds of Winchester past and present in the museum’s three galleries.
Located in the heart of the historic city of Winchester, City Museum tells the story of England’s ancient capital, the seat of Alfred the Great. From its origins as an Iron Age trading centre to Anglo‑Saxon glory, the last journey of Jane Austen to the hunt for King Alfred’s remains, explore the sights and sounds of Winchester past and present in the museum’s three galleries.
High Street
Located in the heart of the historic city of Winchester, City Museum tells the story of England’s ancient capital, the seat of Alfred the Great. From its origins as an Iron Age trading centre to Anglo‑Saxon glory, the last journey of Jane Austen to the hunt for King Alfred’s remains, explore the sights and sounds of Winchester past and present in the museum’s three galleries.
The Hospital of St Cross and Almshouse of Noble Poverty is a medieval almshouse in Winchester, Hampshire, England. It has been described as "England's oldest and most perfect almshouse". Most of the buildings and grounds are open to the public at certain times. It is a Grade I listed building. The Hospital still provides accommodation for a total of 25 elderly men, known as "The Brothers", under the care of "The Master". Adults £5.00 Students and Senior Citizens £4.50 Children under 13 £3.00
9
personas locales recomiendan
The Hospital of St Cross
9
personas locales recomiendan
The Hospital of St Cross and Almshouse of Noble Poverty is a medieval almshouse in Winchester, Hampshire, England. It has been described as "England's oldest and most perfect almshouse". Most of the buildings and grounds are open to the public at certain times. It is a Grade I listed building. The Hospital still provides accommodation for a total of 25 elderly men, known as "The Brothers", under the care of "The Master". Adults £5.00 Students and Senior Citizens £4.50 Children under 13 £3.00
St Swithin’s name is well known through its link with the weather. An ancient rhyme predicts the impact of the elements on his dedicated day, the 15 July… St Swithin’s Day, if thou doest rain / For forty days it will remain: St Swithin’s Day, if thou be fair / For forty days twill rain nae mair. According to legend, Swithun tutored the young King Alfred the Great and took him to Rome. Another legend says is that he built the first stone bridge over the River Itchen that runs through Winchester (where the City Mill & Bishop on the Bridge local pub is currently located). His most famous miracle tells of a simple act of human kindness to a poor woman. When crossing this bridge, she was jostled and dropped her basket of eggs. The saint took pity on her – and made her broken eggs whole. One source claims that when Swithun died, he asked to be buried out of doors of the Cathedral ‘where the feet of ordinary men could pass over him.’ This, and a possible mistranslation of a medieval text, may have given rise to the story that when the Swithun's bones were moved inside the Old Minster on his feast day, 15 July 971, a terrible storm broke out, lasting for 40 days and nights. This is the basis of the popular belief that if it rains on 15 July, it will rain for 40 days. Sadly, this claim has no basis in fact. His remains were kept at Winchester until 1538, when King Henry VIII decreed that his shrine be destroyed. Those responsible reported, “There was in it no piece of gold, nor any ring or true stone, but all great counterfeits. Nevertheless we think these… will amount to near 2,000 marks”. Today the cathedral holds an annual festival to commemorate its long standing links with the saint. St Swithun's School, set in 45 acres is a leading independent and boarding girls school.
St Swithun's School
St Swithin’s name is well known through its link with the weather. An ancient rhyme predicts the impact of the elements on his dedicated day, the 15 July… St Swithin’s Day, if thou doest rain / For forty days it will remain: St Swithin’s Day, if thou be fair / For forty days twill rain nae mair. According to legend, Swithun tutored the young King Alfred the Great and took him to Rome. Another legend says is that he built the first stone bridge over the River Itchen that runs through Winchester (where the City Mill & Bishop on the Bridge local pub is currently located). His most famous miracle tells of a simple act of human kindness to a poor woman. When crossing this bridge, she was jostled and dropped her basket of eggs. The saint took pity on her – and made her broken eggs whole. One source claims that when Swithun died, he asked to be buried out of doors of the Cathedral ‘where the feet of ordinary men could pass over him.’ This, and a possible mistranslation of a medieval text, may have given rise to the story that when the Swithun's bones were moved inside the Old Minster on his feast day, 15 July 971, a terrible storm broke out, lasting for 40 days and nights. This is the basis of the popular belief that if it rains on 15 July, it will rain for 40 days. Sadly, this claim has no basis in fact. His remains were kept at Winchester until 1538, when King Henry VIII decreed that his shrine be destroyed. Those responsible reported, “There was in it no piece of gold, nor any ring or true stone, but all great counterfeits. Nevertheless we think these… will amount to near 2,000 marks”. Today the cathedral holds an annual festival to commemorate its long standing links with the saint. St Swithun's School, set in 45 acres is a leading independent and boarding girls school.
The Guildhall Winchester has a long history, with the original building's construction being completed in 1873; however, the site it was built on has its own unique history. King Alfred the Great's widow, Aelswith, founded a nunnery and retired there after her husband's death in 899AD.
Guildhall Winchester
The Guildhall Winchester has a long history, with the original building's construction being completed in 1873; however, the site it was built on has its own unique history. King Alfred the Great's widow, Aelswith, founded a nunnery and retired there after her husband's death in 899AD.
Wolvesey Castle, also known as the "Old Bishop's Palace", is a ruined castle in Winchester, Hampshire, England. It is located next to Winchester Cathedral. The besieged defenders of Wolvesey burnt with fireballs all the houses of the city which were too near the enceinte and gave cover to the enemy. Most of the old town of Winchester was destroyed. It was once a very important building, and was the location on 25 July 1554 of the wedding breakfast of Queen Mary and Philip II of Spain The extensive surviving ruins are currently owned and maintained by English Heritage. The castle has had Grade I listed status since 24 March 1950, as has the palace located on the same site. A fair amount of the curtain wall remains, but nearly all the inner arrangements are gone, though it is possible to make out the hall, in which there is a good round arch and one surviving Norman window.
Wolvesey Castle
34 College Walk
Wolvesey Castle, also known as the "Old Bishop's Palace", is a ruined castle in Winchester, Hampshire, England. It is located next to Winchester Cathedral. The besieged defenders of Wolvesey burnt with fireballs all the houses of the city which were too near the enceinte and gave cover to the enemy. Most of the old town of Winchester was destroyed. It was once a very important building, and was the location on 25 July 1554 of the wedding breakfast of Queen Mary and Philip II of Spain The extensive surviving ruins are currently owned and maintained by English Heritage. The castle has had Grade I listed status since 24 March 1950, as has the palace located on the same site. A fair amount of the curtain wall remains, but nearly all the inner arrangements are gone, though it is possible to make out the hall, in which there is a good round arch and one surviving Norman window.
Parks & Nature
The River Itchen is a beautiful chalk stream which flows for approximately 28 miles from mid-Hampshire to Southampton. The river has international importance and is designated as a Site of Special Scientific Interest (SSSI) due to its high quality habitats which support a range of protected species including the water vole, otter and white-clawed crayfish. Kingfishers, butterflies and dragonflies are also frequently spotted along the banks. A walk along the River Itchen will provide a fantastic opportunity to not only explore the ancient capital of England but sample some of the finest eateries in Hampshire. Visitors to Winchester can escape the bustle of the city centre and take a leisurely walk along its banks which offer excellent views of the city's medieval defences.
The Itchen Navigation
The River Itchen is a beautiful chalk stream which flows for approximately 28 miles from mid-Hampshire to Southampton. The river has international importance and is designated as a Site of Special Scientific Interest (SSSI) due to its high quality habitats which support a range of protected species including the water vole, otter and white-clawed crayfish. Kingfishers, butterflies and dragonflies are also frequently spotted along the banks. A walk along the River Itchen will provide a fantastic opportunity to not only explore the ancient capital of England but sample some of the finest eateries in Hampshire. Visitors to Winchester can escape the bustle of the city centre and take a leisurely walk along its banks which offer excellent views of the city's medieval defences.
St Catherine’s Hill is a 58 hectare flower-rich chalk grassland nature reserve carefully managed by Hampshire & Isle of Wight Wildlife Trust. It’s home to some stunning wild flowers, and over 25 different species of butterflies including the marbled white, chalkhill blue and brown argus. There are also ramparts of the Iron Age hill fort cut into the 70m high hill, buried ruins of the Norman chapel that gives the site its name and several rectangular burial mounds along Plague Pit Valley which mark the location of mass graves. It offers spectacular views over Winchester, the Itchen Valley and the surrounding countryside.
20
personas locales recomiendan
St. Catherine's Hill
20
personas locales recomiendan
St Catherine’s Hill is a 58 hectare flower-rich chalk grassland nature reserve carefully managed by Hampshire & Isle of Wight Wildlife Trust. It’s home to some stunning wild flowers, and over 25 different species of butterflies including the marbled white, chalkhill blue and brown argus. There are also ramparts of the Iron Age hill fort cut into the 70m high hill, buried ruins of the Norman chapel that gives the site its name and several rectangular burial mounds along Plague Pit Valley which mark the location of mass graves. It offers spectacular views over Winchester, the Itchen Valley and the surrounding countryside.
Why not join the 20,000 other long distance trail users last year and embark on a journey along the South Downs Way. From the ancient city of Winchester to the white cliffs of Eastbourne the trail is 100miles long and has a total ascent of 3,800m/12,600ft (that is three and a half times the height of Mount Snowdon). This route takes you straight through the heart of the South Downs offering inspiring views where ever you stop and hidden gems along the way. Explore the rolling hills, the glorious heathland, the river valleys, ancient woodland, listed buildings, diverse archaeology, thriving villages and market towns. Take your bike, your horse or travel on foot, and why not try it from Eastbourne to Winchester.
55
personas locales recomiendan
South Downs National Park
55
personas locales recomiendan
Why not join the 20,000 other long distance trail users last year and embark on a journey along the South Downs Way. From the ancient city of Winchester to the white cliffs of Eastbourne the trail is 100miles long and has a total ascent of 3,800m/12,600ft (that is three and a half times the height of Mount Snowdon). This route takes you straight through the heart of the South Downs offering inspiring views where ever you stop and hidden gems along the way. Explore the rolling hills, the glorious heathland, the river valleys, ancient woodland, listed buildings, diverse archaeology, thriving villages and market towns. Take your bike, your horse or travel on foot, and why not try it from Eastbourne to Winchester.
St. Giles Hill is the summit of a Chalk Spur, which fails steeply to east bank of River Itchen. Formerly a bare down, on which, in the late 11th Century, the St. Giles Fair, the largest fair in Europe was held every September. For the sixteen days of the fair, all other trading in Winchester ceased, and the Bishop received the revenues normally due to the King. Encroached upon by villa building at the end of the 19th Century, when the trees to be seen today were planted. Public outcry stopped the building, and saved the summit and south west slopes of hill as open space, which affords magnificent views over the City and St. Catherine’s Hill. Free of charge.
St. Giles Hill - View Point
St. Giles Hill is the summit of a Chalk Spur, which fails steeply to east bank of River Itchen. Formerly a bare down, on which, in the late 11th Century, the St. Giles Fair, the largest fair in Europe was held every September. For the sixteen days of the fair, all other trading in Winchester ceased, and the Bishop received the revenues normally due to the King. Encroached upon by villa building at the end of the 19th Century, when the trees to be seen today were planted. Public outcry stopped the building, and saved the summit and south west slopes of hill as open space, which affords magnificent views over the City and St. Catherine’s Hill. Free of charge.
This small peaceful garden created in the 1990s to commemorate Thomas Garnier, Dean of Winchester 1840–1872. Resting quietly in the shadow of the medieval wall, the garden is a place of stillness and beauty, with a magnificent view of the Cathedral’s south transept. You’ll find it up a short flight of steps behind a fine 13th-century doorway leading off the Inner Close – just look for the sign. At the top of the steps, you enter the first of three rather different ‘sections’ of the garden, all linked by medieval elements and maintained by a small team of volunteers.
Dean Garnier Garden
This small peaceful garden created in the 1990s to commemorate Thomas Garnier, Dean of Winchester 1840–1872. Resting quietly in the shadow of the medieval wall, the garden is a place of stillness and beauty, with a magnificent view of the Cathedral’s south transept. You’ll find it up a short flight of steps behind a fine 13th-century doorway leading off the Inner Close – just look for the sign. At the top of the steps, you enter the first of three rather different ‘sections’ of the garden, all linked by medieval elements and maintained by a small team of volunteers.