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Amazing Full Apartment / Centro Histórico CDMX

SuperAnfitriónCentro, Ciudad de México, México
Departamento con servicios completo - Anfitrión: Alfonso
6 huéspedes3 habitaciones4 camas1 baño completo y uno de tocador
Alojamiento entero
Dispondrás de toda la vivienda (apartamento con servicios) para ti.
Limpieza avanzada
Este anfitrión se ha comprometido a seguir un riguroso protocolo de limpieza que hemos elaborado en colaboración con expertos de prestigio en los ámbitos de la salud y la hospitalidad. Más información
Alfonso tiene la categoría de Superhost
Los Superhosts son anfitriones con experiencia y valoraciones excelentes que se esfuerzan para que la estancia de sus huéspedes sea siempre perfecta.
Ubicación fantástica
El 100 % de los últimos huéspedes han valorado con 5 estrellas la ubicación.
A fantastic apartment in an excellent location with plenty of room to rest and enjoy Mexico City. Located three blocks from Zocalo (Main Square) in Historic Center, this flat is close within walking distance and metro stations to get to a myriad of museums, parks, restaurants, bus stations, airport, churches and more... tastefully decorated space to stay for as many days as you wish...

El alojamiento
Spacious and beautiful apartment located in amazing Art Deco building... with great view as it is on a third floor and nice restaurants and bars around the corner. Its decoration is proper from the 50's - 60's era, making it a eclectic and functional for travelers, business people and architecture lovers...

Acceso para huéspedes
The complete apartment is open for our guests disposal.
A fantastic apartment in an excellent location with plenty of room to rest and enjoy Mexico City. Located three blocks from Zocalo (Main Square) in Historic Center, this flat is close within walking distance and metro stations to get to a myriad of museums, parks, restaurants, bus stations, airport, churches and more... tastefully decorated space to stay for as many days as you wish...

El alojamient…

Distribución de las camas

Habitación 1
1 cama matrimonial
Habitación 2
1 cama matrimonial
Habitación 3
2 camas individuales

Servicios

Wifi
Cocina
Secadora
Lavadora
Zona para trabajar con computadora portátil
TV
Ganchos para ropa
Secador de pelo
Plancha
Elementos básicos

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4.86 estrellas sobre 5 basadas en 51 evaluaciones
4.86 (51 evaluaciones)

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Ubicación

Centro, Ciudad de México, México

The neighborhood is right in the center of Mexico City, considered as Historic Downtown, with great choices of restaurants, bars and coffee shops around the corner, in Regina Street. There are also a lot of touristic attractions within walking distance: Bellas Artes / Fine Arts Museum, MUNAL National Arts Museum, Zocalo- Main Square, Cathedral, Central Park, Main Post Office, National Government Palace and some more...

The Centro Histórico de la Ciudad de México (English: Historic Centre of Mexico City English: Historic Center of Mexico City), also known as the Centro or Centro Histórico, is the central neighborhood in Mexico City, Mexico, focused on Zócalo or main plaza and extending in all directions for a number of blocks, with its farthest extent being west to the Alameda Central.The Zocalo is the largest plaza in Latin America. It can hold up to nearly 100,000 people.
This section of the capital has just over nine square km and occupies 668 blocks. It contains 9,000 buildings, 1,550 of which have been declared of historical importance. Most of these historic buildings were constructed between the 16th and 20th centuries. It is divided into two zones for preservation purposes. Zone A encompasses the pre-Hispanic city and its expansion from the Viceroy period until Independence. Zone B covers the areas all other constructions to the end of the 19th century that are considered indispensable to the preservation of the area's architectural and cultural heritage.
This is where the Spaniards began to build what is now modern Mexico City in the 16th century on the ruins of the conquered Tenochtitlan, capital of the Aztec Empire. As the centre of the ancient Aztec Empire and the seat of power for the Spanish colony of New Spain, the Centro Historico contains most of the city's historic sites from both eras as well as a large number of museums. This has made it a World Heritage Site.

What is now the historic downtown of Mexico City roughly correlates with the ancient Aztec city of Tenochtitlan, which was founded around 1325. During the prehispanic era, the city developed in a planned fashion, with streets and canals aligned with the cardinal directions, leading to orderly square blocks. The island that the city was founded on was divided into four calpullis or neighborhoods that were divided by the main north-south roads leading to Tepeyac and Iztapalapa respectively and the west-east road that lead to Tacuba and to a dike into the lake, respectively. The calpullis were named Cuepopan, Atzacualco, Moyotla and Zoquipan, which had subdivisions and a "tecpan" or district council each. The intersection of these roads was the center of the city and of the Aztec world. Here were the Templo Mayor, the palaces of the tlatoani or emperors, palaces of nobles such as the "House of the Demons" and the "House of the Flowers". Also located here were the two most renowned Aztec schools: the Telpuchcalli for secular studies and the Calmecac for priestly training. When the Spaniards arrived, the city had aqueducts built by Moctezuma Ilhuicamina and Ahuizotl as well as a large dike constructed to the east of the city.
After the Spanish conquest, this design remained largely intact, mostly due to the efforts of Alonso Garcia Bravo, who supervised much of the rebuilding of the city. This reconstruction conserved many of the main thoroughfares such as Tenayuca, renamed Vallejo; Tlacopan, renamed México Tacuba, and Tepeyac, now called the Calzada de los Misterios. They also kept major divisions of the city adding Christian prefixes to the names such as San Juan Moyotla, Santa María Tlaquechiuacan, San Sebastián Atzacualco and San Pedro Teopan. In fact, most of the centro historicos is built with the rubble of the destroyed Aztec city.
A number of people during this time, all Spaniards, accumulated vast wealth mostly through mining and commerce in the 17th and 18th centuries. This wealth is reflected in the various mansions scattered in the centro such as the Palace of Iturbide and Casa de Azulejos (House of Tiles). This house was built in the 16th century in Arab style but its namesake tiles were added in 1747 when the Count of the Valley of Orizaba ordered the Talavera tiles from Puebla.
In the early part of the 20th century, as a result of the Latin American posture of then-Minister of Public Education José Vasconcelos, many of the streets to the north and west of the Zocalo were renamed after Latin American countries.

Historically, the Zócalo, or main plaza, has been a venue for fine and popular cultural events. Some example of events held here recently are Spencer Tunick's photo shoot, the Ashes and Snow Nomadic museum and a skateboarding/BMX event that drew 50,000 young people on 24 August 2008. The Festival de México is an annual event with programs dedicated to art (popular and high) and academia. In 2008, was the 24th Festival with 254 performances and shows from over 20 countries in 65 plazas and other locations in this section of the city.
It is central to national level protests such as those staged by Lopez Obrador after the 2006 Presidential Elections and the nationwide protest against crime held on August 30, 2008.


The National Palace in Mexico City
Just off the Zócalo are the Palacio Nacional, the Cathedral Metropolitana, the Templo Mayor with its adjoining museum, and Nacional Monte de Piedad building. The Palacio Nacional borders the entire east side of the Zocalo and contains the offices of the President of Mexico, the Federal Treasury, the National Archives as wells as murals depicting pre-Hispanic life and a large mural filling the central stairway depicting the entire history of the Mexican nation from the Conquest on. This palace was built on the ruins of Moctezuma II's palace beginning in 1521, using the same tezontle stone used to build the Aztec palace. It was originally in the Hernán Cortés family until the king of Spain bought it to house the viceroys of New Spain and remained so (despite being destroyed and rebuilt again in 1692) until Mexican independence. Facing the Zócalo above a central balcony is the Campana (Bell) of Dolores, which is rung by the president each 15th of Sept to celebrate Independence.


Mexico City Cathedral
The Metropolitan Cathedral, dedicated to the Assumption of the Most Blessed Virgin Mary, occupies the north end of the Zócalo. The site originally was part of the Aztec Sacred Precinct (called the Teocalli) and contained the main tzompantli, or rack for the skulls of sacrifice victims. The first church was erected between 1524 or 1526 and 1532 and was elevated to the rank of cathedral on 2 September 1530 by Pope Clement VII. The foundations for a new cathedral were begun in 1562 and the foundation stone was laid in 1573 in the time of Archbishop Pedro Moya de Contreras and of the 4th Viceroy. Although the works had not been concluded, the cathedral received its first dedication on 2 February 1656. The completion in 1813 of the neo-classical additions designed by Manuel Tolsa was celebrated on 15 August 2013 by Cardinal Carrera who opened and entered through the Holy Door in the center of the façade prior to celebrating Pontifical High Mass in the cathedral.
Between 1989 and 2000 extensive engineering works were conducted to arrest and rectify damage and distortions caused to the structure by the uneven rate and extent of the sinking of the building provoked by the continuous settlement of the ground on which it stands. This began with the drainage of the lake of the Valley of Mexico initiated in 1607 and has continued with the reduction of the water-table caused by the pumping of water for use by Mexico City's rapidly expanding population. The last of the temporary props which had disfigured the interior of the building during the engineering works were removed on 28 November 2000.


A view of the ruins of the Templo Mayor with museum in background
The Templo Mayor archeological site and museum, is the center of the ancient teocalli, located now just northeast of the Zócalo. It was demolished by Hernán Cortés in the 1520s and its location forgotten. The exact site was determined in the beginning of the 20th century, but the decision to excavate was not made until 1978, when electrical workers chanced upon an eight-ton stone disk depicting the Aztec goddess Coyauhqui. Excavation unearthed a pyramid built in multiple layers. This is the spot where, according to legend, the Aztecs saw their sign to settle from their wanderings, an eagle perched on a nopal cactus with a snake in its beak, which is still the symbol of Mexico today.


National Monte de Piedad
The Nacional Monte de Piedad building is the national pawn shop, founded in 1775 and one of the largest second-hand shops in the world. On this site were houses that belonged to the last Aztec ruler, Moctezuma II, which Hernán Cortés took for his own after the Conquest. These houses originally stretched from modern-day Isabel la Catolica, Madero, Tacuba and Monte de Piedad streets, prompting one chronicler, Cervantes de Salazar to comment that the residence was not a palace but rather another city.
The neighborhood is right in the center of Mexico City, considered as Historic Downtown, with great choices of restaurants, bars and coffee shops around the corner, in Regina Street. There are also a lot of tou…

Anfitrión: Alfonso

Se registró en octubre de 2015
  • 69 evaluaciones
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  • SuperAnfitrión
Soy viajero apasionado me encanta descubrir nuevos lugares, administrador de profesión, comerciante de tradición. Me encanta el contacto con la gente, me gusta atender de la misma manera que me gustaría que me atendieran. Mi desarrollo como Asesor de Imagen y Personal Shopper me ha dejado muchas satisfacciones. VIVA LA VIDA
Soy viajero apasionado me encanta descubrir nuevos lugares, administrador de profesión, comerciante de tradición. Me encanta el contacto con la gente, me gusta atender de la misma…
Durante tu estancia
We will be available to answer any special requests as well as to help our guests have a great stay in Mexico City
Alfonso es SuperAnfitrión
Los SuperAnfitriones son anfitriones con experiencia y evaluaciones excelentes, que se esfuerzan al máximo por ofrecer estancias maravillosas a sus huéspedes.
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Reglas de la casa
Llegada: De 15:00 a 21:00
Salida: 11:00
No adecuado para bebés (menores de 2 años)
Prohibido fumar
No se admiten mascotas
No se admiten fiestas o eventos
Salud y seguridad
Comprometido con el protocolo de limpieza avanzada. Más información
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